History of the School

Motor/Codell, KS

1915

Vol. I

Published by

The Junior Class of Codell High School

Vernon Overholser, Mgr.; Aura Adams & Bessie Powell; Editors-in-Chiefs

Press of The Ford Printery, Plainville, Kansas

 

            Along Paradise Creek in the early seventies, in the neighborhood and vicinity of what was later known as Motor, came the first settlers from the eastern states to procure homes and make a livelihood for themselves and families.  On account of shelter and fuel the settlement was all or nearly all on the creek.  The post office was Floreyville located about midway between Codell and Natoma.  Some few years later in the years of 1877 and 1878 the country had quite a boom and settlers came thick and fast, settling up the surrounding prairie country.  By this time there was seen in the community the need of school, but the question of paying the teacher was the one problem—cash being a very scarce article.  In attempting to give a short write up of the history of what is now the Codell school we will for convenience divide into epochs as to time and place of holding school.

 

First Epoch, or Subscription School

            Not having any school organization yet and seeing the great need of school facilities some of the more interested ones of the district circulated subscriptions and secured enough funds to have school for three months.  There were two short terms taught by subscription in what was known at that time as the Perry House, just east and south of Codell, now owned by S R Tucker.  This first term of school was taught by Mrs. Mary Netherland (now Mrs. WH Johnson), and the second term by Mattie Skirvin for which they received the sum of $12 per month as salary. 

The following names of the pupils of the first school: Aaron Roberts, Ella Roberts, Alice Roberts, John Darland, Libbie Chase, Sallie Moore, Arthur Sever, George Johnson, Oscar Florey, Lessie Johnson, Maud Woodruff, Kate Woodruff, Bert Woodruff, George Drake, Rose Drake, Reanie Drake, Agnes Sever, Eddie Chase, Amos Bromley, Herrick Bromley, Frank Watkins, Mina Watkins, Harry Netherland.

In 1879 there was organized District No 11, known as the Motor School, with the following officers elected: Antone Sever, director; S B Linn, treasurer; D L Watkins, clerk.  Having outgrown the size for accommodations at the Perry House, which was a log structure, bonds were voted and a new sod school was built just west of what is now known as Motor Hill.

 

 

 

Second Epoch, or First Motor Sod

            During this period, which was about six years, the terms were not long varying from one to four months in length.  The furniture in the new sod schoolhouse consisted mostly of benches.  these benches were taken from the native timber and were sawed at Chase’s Saw Mill.  They served the purpose very well, as they were good and strong.  These benches were replaced, however, in a few years by a better seat and desk made of lumber.

            According to records and other information we give the names of the teachers in order with salary and length of term of each –

            Ida M Tillotson            ………………………………………    2 months………..               $20.00

            Mrs. Harriet Romine………………………………….        2 months………..               20.00

            G S Brown ……………………………………………..       3 months…………   20.00

            Lula S Frisbie …………………………………………..            1 month ………… 20.00

            Ellen Craen ……………………………………………..       3 months ………..  20.00

            J N McCarroll …………………………………………..            3 months ………..  20.00

            John Hoskins ………………………………………..            3 months…………            $25.00

            I W Rouse ……………………………………………         1 month ………… 30.00

            R W Hoskins………………………………………….            3 months …………. 25.00

            John Hoskins (second term) …………………..            4 months …………  25.00

 

Third Epoch, or Second Motor Frame

            In 1886 a new house was erected near the site of the old sod building.  This building was made of lumber hauled from Hays City and at that time was probably one of the leading school buildings of the county.  This probably was a marked epoch in the advancement of the school of District No. 11, and characterized the people of this locality as favoring the best in school advancement.

            The first two terms taught in this building were important and will be remembered as such by the pupils and patrons who still reside in the community, because of the number of scholars and the great interest taken and amount of work done.

            The teachers who we classify as having taught in the third epoch of the history of the district and the length of terms are given as follows:

            J H Tucker …………………………………………….        1 term of 4 months

            W N Boggs ……………………………………………         1 term of 6 months

            W I Jones ……………………………………………..       1 term of 2 months

            J Bryant ………………………………………………..     1 term of 6 months

            F H Ogborn …………………………………………..            1 term of 6 months

            Nannie Hershberger ……………………………….            1 term of 3 months

            Viroda Patterson ……………………………………            1 term of 3 months

            E G Ganoung …………………………………………            1 term of 6 months

            A K Mickey …………………………………………….        1 term of 5 months

 

Fourth Epoch

            In 1887 the U.P. railroad was built through the district and located the city of Codell about one mile south and west of the old town site of Motor where the former school building stood.  This necessitated a change of location of the school building which was made with the same characteristic energy and advancement that had been manifested since the beginning of the first subscription school the people taxed themselves to erect in 1894, what was at that time a good two story frame building, and furnished it to meet the educational ideas and requirements of that time.  The first teacher in the new building was R. R. Richmond who taught a three month spring term.  At the annual school meeting of 1894 it was decided to employ two teachers, so in the winter of 1894 and ’95 the school had its first advantage of a two-room school.  E G Ganoung was employed as principal and S R Tucker for primary room for a term of seven months.  This was followed by a short spring term by J F  Langdon.

            The teachers who taught in this epoch and length of terms come in order as follows:

            R. R. Richmond                                                          April, May, June 1894

            EG Ganoung & SR Tucker                          Fall & Winter 1894-1895

            JF Langdon                                                            Spring 1895

            HJ Lambert                                                            1895-1896

            RR Richmond, SR Tucker, Bertha Davis                 1896-1897

            Kate Hunter & Bertha Davis                             1897-1898

            Mr. & Mrs. HJ Lambert                                     1898-1899

            Mr. & Mrs. HJ Lambert                                     1899-1900

            Kate Hunter & Emma Johnson                         1900-1901

            WF Hughes & Anna Farrier                          1901-1902

            WF Hughes & Millie McCord                         1902-1903

            Grace Crandall & Millie McCord                         1903-1904

            William Graham & Anna Overholser                     1904-1905    

            Ira C Snyder & Irene Howatt                          1905-1906

            Ira C Snyder & Irene Howatt                          1906-1907

            EA Wells & Maude King                                          1907-1908

            JR Ranmaker & Cora Glendenning                   1908-1909

 

Fifth Epoch

            This now brings us up to the fifth or present epoch of the history of the district.  The population of the district and the need for advanced educational advantages demanded a better and more modern building equipped to meet the advancement of the surrounding country, the outgrowth of which was the beautiful modern building equipped with steam heat and built to fill the requirements of the state laws and of which the district is justly proud.  The work in the present building was begun in 1910 by Wallace Sullivan as principal, assisted by HO Darland and Mabel McCarroll.

            It was continued as three-room ten-grade school by the following teachers:

            Emma Stryker, principal

            HO Darland and Mabel McCarroll, assistants                      1911-1912

 

            Sarah Burnham, principal

            Jessie McCord Miller and Mabel McCarroll, assistants            1912-1913

 

            HD Wallace, principal

            Ethel Prosser and Mabel McCarroll, assistants                      1913-1914

 

            In 1914 the district hired as principal Prof. CF Williams and assistants, Jennie Fesler and Grace Mathews.  After consultation with Professor Williams the board decided that it would be an advantage to this and surrounding districts to install four teachers with a complete course of twelve grades.  A special meeting was called and the board instructed to procure the fourth teacher and install the twelve grades.  Mary Williams was then procured as assistant teacher.

The work done in this term and the results obtained are a fitting climax to a long line of school history, which as the above facts show has been one of continual advancement.

            In gathering the data for this history and reviewing the names of those who have at one time or another been connected with the school as instructors and pupils that their records in school work and in the business world will compare favorably with teachers and pupils of any school under like conditions.

            Next year (1916) the board has been authorized to hire five teachers, equip the school with splendid scientific apparatus, buy a great number of reference books for the library, secure play ground improvements, and floor the basement for laboratory purposes.

            This will make Codell one of the foremost school towns of its size in the state and will help it maintain its reputation of having given more teachers to the county than any other school.